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HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: Twitter

Posted in International/EU Privacy, News & Events

Hogan Lovells Publishes White Paper Analyzing Service Provider Transparency Reports: Law Enforcement Requests for Data in the U.S. Not Extraordinary When Compared with Rest of World

Hogan Lovells today published the next installment in a series of White Papers examining government access to data held by service providers. Today’s publication, An Analysis of Service Provider Transparency Reports on Government Requests for Data, examines the most recent transparency reports published by Google, Microsoft, Skype, Twitter, and LinkedIn concerning law enforcement requests for data in multiple countries, concluding that when the numbers are adjusted for population sizes and the number of Internet users in each respective country, they reveal that the U.S. government requests information from these providers at a rate comparable to — and sometimes lower than — that of several other countries, including many European Union member states.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy, Social Media

IAPP Piece Explores Jurisdictional Implications of French Court’s Privacy/Hate Speech Dilemma

On June 12, a French Court of Appeals upheld a decision ordering Twitter to divulge the identities of the authors of anti-Semitic tweets, which are illegal under French law. In a detailed analysis of the court’s order for the IAPP Privacy Perspectives blog, Winston Maxwell and Christopher Wolf describe how the order, issued directly by the French court to California-based Twitter, which does not have a French establishment, implicates jurisdictional issues and calls into question the use of anonymity as a privacy shield to post hate speech online.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

FTC Announces Settlement with Facebook

The Federal Trade Commission this afternoon announced a proposed consent decree with the prominent social network Facebook, settling allegations that Facebook violated Section 5 of the FTC Act by failing to live up to representations made to consumers regarding its privacy practices. Among other remedial measures, the FTC required Facebook to obtain independent privacy compliance audits for the next 20 years. Along with the FTC’s recent consent decrees with Google and Twitter, the FTC now effectively has regulatory oversight over the privacy and data security practices of the three most prominent social networking companies in the United States.