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HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: EU US Safe Harbor

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EU Data Transfers: Considering Your Options After Today’s Article 29 Working Party Statement

The EU’s Article 29 Working Party issued a statement today on the recent Schrems decision invalidating the adequacy of the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor framework, emphasizing that affected businesses should start to put in place legal and technical solutions in a timely manner to meet EU data protection standards. The statement gave a January 2016 deadline for companies to come into compliance with the ruling, at which point EU data protection authorities would be “committed to take all necessary and appropriate actions, which may include coordinated enforcement actions.” In response, we publish here a high-level analysis of the possible options available for companies—including the EU Standard Contractual Clauses, Intra-Group Agreements and other ad-hoc contracts, Binding Corporate Rules, Safe Harbor 2.0, and consent—and the pros and cons of choosing each one.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Recording and Deck from Webinar: Safe Harbor Invalidated – What Next?

Thank you to everyone who participated in today’s webinar “Safe Harbor Invalidated – What Next?”, in which we analyzed the implications of yesterday’s decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union invalidating the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor Framework. A copy of the slide deck and a link to a recording of the webinar are attached to this post.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Safe Harbor Invalidated – What Next?

On 6 October 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union declared the EU-US Safe Harbor framework invalid as a mechanism to legitimize transfers of personal data from the EU to the US. This decision effectively leaves any organisation that relied on Safe Harbor exposed to claims that such data transfers are unlawful. In this post, we outline the effects of the decision and a suggested plan of action, and include details for a webinar we will be hosting on Wednesday, 7 October to discuss the next steps that organisations should take.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Hogan Lovells Partner Considers Potential CJEU Ruling on Safe Harbor

The fact that the Safe Harbor framework is permanently in the firing line is not particularly earth-shattering, but the prospect of the top European court declaring its inadequacy later this year could have dramatic consequences. This prospect became all the more possible after a hearing at the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in Luxembourg in March. In an article published in the May 2015 issue of Privacy Laws & Business International Report, Eduardo Ustaran, Partner in Hogan Lovells’ Global Privacy and Information Management Practice, explores the policy climate that led to the CJEU’s potential reckoning of the Safe Harbor and the potential consequences of the eventual ruling.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

The Privacy Challenges of the New European Commission

The European Union’s executive branch has a brand new engine. Following the European Parliament’s election earlier this year and after months of political manoeuvring, a new European Commission is now in place and fully operational. The Commission’s functions remain as they were but under a revised structure of one president – Jean-Claude Juncker – seven vice-presidents responsible for designated policy areas and 20 commissioners. As the main policy making body in the European Union, the Commission continues to be in charge of pushing forward the ongoing data protection legislative reform that will lead to a new legal framework for privacy across the EU.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Irish High Court Refers Questions to European Court of Justice: Can National DPAs Disregard Safe Harbor?

In a new turn to the Maximilian Schrems case in Ireland, the Irish High Court on 18 June 2014 decided to refer several questions to the European Court of Justice, including whether national data protection authorities in Europe may disregard the Safe Harbor decision of the European Commission when assessing whether the U.S. recipient of data ensures an adequate level of data protection required under EU law. Depending on the outcome of the case, European and U.S. companies may not be able to rely on Safe Harbor to legitimise cross-border data transfers in the future.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

International Data Transfers – The Challenge Continues

The discussion at the Council of the EU in the context of the European data protection legislative reform that took place on 6 June is by no means the end of a process which is likely to carry on for at least a year, but it provided a helpful pointer as to where the policy making thinking is. One of the biggest challenges that organisations operating in the EU have faced since the 1990s is the prohibition on transfers of data to jurisdictions outside the EU without equivalent standards of data protection. The ongoing legislative reform is an opportunity to review the existing regime and bring it into line with today’s data globalisation.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy

FTC Settles Actions Against Twelve Companies for Improperly Representing Safe Harbor Certification

Less than two months after the European Commission issued a report urging the Federal Trade Commission to step up enforcement of the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor framework, the FTC announced a settlement with twelve companies — including an Internet service provider, makers of consumer goods, three National Football League teams, and a developer of mobile applications — over allegations that they deceptively claimed to be certified under Safe Harbor. According to the FTC, each of these companies represented that they maintained a active Safe Harbor certification with the U.S. Department of Commerce when in fact they did not.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy

European Commission Calls for Data Transfer Reforms

On November 27, the European Commission released a strategy memo on rebuilding trust in the mechanisms allowing data to flow from the European Union (“EU”) to the United States. The Commission recognizes that EU-U.S. data flows are essential to the strategic and economic partnerships between the two markets. However, revelations about U.S. surveillance programs have, according to the Commission, caused EU Member States and citizens to believe that the current data transfer mechanisms do not provide adequate protections for personal data. To address those concerns and rebuild trust in transatlantic data flows, the Commission recommends six initiatives, including specific recommendations for reforming the U.S. privacy framework. Of particular note, the Commission identified several shortcomings with the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor framework and offered 13 recommendations for reform. And the Commission once again calls on the United States to adopt comprehensive privacy legislation.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy

Hogan Lovells Column in Law360 on Post-Snowden Fallout in the EU and Its Impact on US Privacy Relations

The bromide that people in glass houses should not throw stones comes to mind when one hears European Union authorities criticizing the U.S. privacy framework as a whole because of the recent National Security Agency revelations.

Earlier this summer, EU Vice-President Viviane Reding called EU data protection reform “the answer to PRISM [one of the Snowden NSA disclosures]” and called PRISM a “wake-up call.” Reding said that the EU-U.S. safe harbor “may not be so safe after all” and warned that the commission will present a “solid assessment” of the safe harbor by the end of the year, ominously suggesting that the withdrawal of an adequacy finding for the safe harbor (required under EU law for it to remain in effect).

Posted in International/EU Privacy, News & Events

EU VP Reding Uses PRISM as Lever to Push Enactment of Regulation and Questions EU-US Safe Harbor

Earlier today, in a brisk memo (reproduced in its entirety below), EU Vice President Viviane Reding called EU data protection reform “the answer to PRISM” and called PRISM a “wake-up call.”  She itemized the need for broad jurisdiction and enforcement, and stated that governments collecting data on EU citizens outside their territory never should obtain it directly from […]