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HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: ECJ

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Why the U.S. Is Held to a Higher Data Protection Standard Than France

In a recent column for The New York Times, Nils Muiznieks, the top human rights official for the Council of Europe, warned that recent surveillance laws in Europe undermine fundamental rights for European citizens. Plus, an October 29, 2015, resolution of the European Parliament complains of an “obvious downward spiral” resulting from mass surveillance laws in the U.S. and Europe. That certain European countries have laws permitting mass surveillance is not news to lawyers who follow the matter. In a 2012 whitepaper, we highlighted the broad and sometimes unsupervised powers of intelligence agencies of certain European governments. As Muiznieks’s column states, intelligence agencies are getting more surveillance power, not less. France’s July 2015 surveillance law permits intelligence agencies to scan metadata of all citizens in order to detect suspicious patterns. Other European countries are also broadening surveillance powers to protect against terrorism.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EU Data Protection: ECJ Extends the Long Arm of the Law

National EU member state courts, as well as the European Court of Justice, have struggled for several years to define the scope of application of EU data protection law in individual member states. In a decision that provides important guidelines on the competence of, and co-operation between, national data protection authorities, the ECJ has clarified how data protection law applies in cross-border situations within the EU.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Hogan Lovells Partner Considers Potential CJEU Ruling on Safe Harbor

The fact that the Safe Harbor framework is permanently in the firing line is not particularly earth-shattering, but the prospect of the top European court declaring its inadequacy later this year could have dramatic consequences. This prospect became all the more possible after a hearing at the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in Luxembourg in March. In an article published in the May 2015 issue of Privacy Laws & Business International Report, Eduardo Ustaran, Partner in Hogan Lovells’ Global Privacy and Information Management Practice, explores the policy climate that led to the CJEU’s potential reckoning of the Safe Harbor and the potential consequences of the eventual ruling.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Is Appointing an EU Controller Still Valuable for Global Businesses?

The dust has yet to settle but much has already been said about the implications of the Google Spain decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union and the right to be forgotten. The controversy has focused on the impact of this judgment on freedom of expression and the right of access to information, as well as the potentially devastating effect of a large amount of deletion requests. EU regulators are wondering – like everybody else – how big and unmanageable this is going to get, whilst search engines scramble for resources to deal with the unknown. With the prospect of an even more demanding EU privacy framework looming over the horizon, the right to be forgotten decision is a potential game changer for the whole Internet industry. But the CJEU did not just enable an unprecedented level of control by individuals over their data, it shook the basis on which the applicability of EU data protection law has been understood until now.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

UK Government Seeks to Preserve Data Retention Powers

On 10 July, the UK government announced cross-party backing for emergency legislation designed to ensure that the police and security services can continue to access communications data held by communications service providers for the purpose of investigating criminal activity and protecting national security. This is in response to the recent European Court of Justice judgment of 8 April 2014 in joined cases (C-293/12 Digital Rights Ireland & C-594/12 Seitlinger) which declared the Data Retention Directive (2006/24/EC) invalid.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Irish High Court Refers Questions to European Court of Justice: Can National DPAs Disregard Safe Harbor?

In a new turn to the Maximilian Schrems case in Ireland, the Irish High Court on 18 June 2014 decided to refer several questions to the European Court of Justice, including whether national data protection authorities in Europe may disregard the Safe Harbor decision of the European Commission when assessing whether the U.S. recipient of data ensures an adequate level of data protection required under EU law. Depending on the outcome of the case, European and U.S. companies may not be able to rely on Safe Harbor to legitimise cross-border data transfers in the future.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Reflections on Europe’s “Right to Be Forgotten”

In an Op-Ed for the National Post entitled “Sorry, but there’s no online ‘right to be forgotten’,” privacy advocates Ann Cavoukian and Christopher Wolf team up to consider the consequences of the European Court of Justice’s “Right to Be Forgotten” ruling. The pair focus on potential conflicts created by the Right to Be Forgotten between the right to privacy and that of free expression and highlight the plausible outcome that companies, in their new forced role as online censors, may “err on the side of deleting links to information.”

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EU High Court Grants “Right to Be Forgotten” and Expands Privacy Jurisdiction Over Foreign Companies: What Should Businesses Operating Outside of Europe Do Now?

A recent article by Hogan Lovells provides key takeaways for businesses in light of last week’s landmark ruling by the European Court of Justice that in effect judicially sanctioned a “right to be forgotten” allowing data subjects to scrub their names from a public record while also extending jurisdiction under European data protection law to include non-EU companies that may have a branch or subsidiary in the European Union and that collect data in the context of business activities in the European Union.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

ECJ Declares Data Retention Directive Invalid

In a decision rendered on 8 April 2014, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) declared the Data Retention Directive invalid. The Court’s decision was grounded on its conclusion that, by requiring the retention of the data falling within the scope of the Directive, and by allowing the competent national authorities to access those data, the Directive interferes in a particularly serious manner with the fundamental rights to respect for private life and to the protection of personal data.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

An injunction too far: The Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) rules out injunctions against ISPs that allow general filtering to prevent illegal downloading

In the SABAM case, the ECJ held that the Belgian court erred in ordering an ISP to install a wide ranging filtering system, recognized that internet users do not have a fundamental right to illegally download copyrighted material, and leaves the door open to more targeted actions.