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HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: data protection

Posted in Consumer Privacy

Is Artificial Intelligence the Ultimate Test for Privacy?

Nothing challenges the effectiveness of data protection law like technological innovation. You think you have cracked a technology neutral framework and then along comes the next evolutionary step in the chain to rock the boat. It happened with the cloud. It happened with social media, with mobile, with online behavioural targeting and with the Internet of Things. And from the combination of all of that, artificial intelligence is emerging as the new testing ground. 21st century artificial intelligence relies on machine learning, and machine learning relies on…? You guessed it: Data. Artificial intelligence is essentially about problem solving and for that we need data, as much data as possible. Against this background, data privacy and cybersecurity legal frameworks around the world are attempting to shape the use of that data in a way that achieves the best of all worlds: progress and protection for individuals. Is that realistically achievable?

Posted in News & Events

Privacy and Cybersecurity March 2018 Events

Don’t miss out on key events from our Privacy and Cybersecurity team in March 2018. This month, our team will be discussing a variety of privacy and cybersecurity issues ranging from autonomous vehicle privacy to GDPR compliance. We hope you can join us!

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Misunderstandings, Panic and Priorities in the Year of the GDPR

It is finally here. This is the year of the GDPR. A journey that started with an ambitious policy paper about modernising data protection almost a decade ago – a decade! – is about to reach flying altitude. No more ‘in May next year this, in May next year that’. Our time has come. Given the amount of attention that the GDPR has received in recent times, data protection professionals are in high demand but we are ready. We knew this was coming and we have had years to prepare. However, even the most seasoned practitioners are at risk of being engulfed by the frantic fire-fighting mood out there. The hamster wheel of GDPR compliance is spinning faster and faster, but it is precisely now when we must look up, see the bigger picture and focus on getting the important things right.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Thinking Strategically About Brexit and Data Protection

To date, the main legacy of the Brexit referendum of 2016 appears to be a country split in half: some badly wish the UK would continue to be a member of the EU and some are equally keen on making a move. Yet, there seems to be at least one thing on which Remainers and Leavers will agree: nobody knows exactly what is going to happen. The same is true of the effect of Brexit on UK data protection. However, as Brexit day approaches, it is becoming imperative for those with responsibility for data protection compliance to make some crucial strategic decisions. To help with that process, here are some pointers about what we know and what we don’t know.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Why Companies in Mexico Should Reassess Their Compliance with Data Privacy Protocols—and Their Risk of a Data Breach

According to the Constitution of Mexico, the protection of personal data is a fundamental right of all Mexican citizens. Under federal law, individuals also have a right to access, change, oppose, or suppress their personal data. Although all private companies process data, some are not sufficiently familiar with Mexico’s data privacy principles and regulations, and many may not have an up-to-date assessment of their own risk of a data breach. In addition, they may not be aware that the Mexican Supreme Court’s recent shift in perspective regarding personal injury cases may herald a change in the way data privacy breaches are handled in the future. This interview explores the impact of Mexico’s data privacy regulations on private companies, discusses the unique approach of Mexican regulators to data privacy enforcement, and offers advice as to how companies can stay compliant.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Privacy in 2018: Expect the Unexpected

Making predictions for the year ahead is possibly as desirable as unreliable. In a world of unlimited data and advanced science, it would be tempting to think that the future is already written. Algorithms and artificial intelligence will show us what lies ahead with immaculate accuracy. Or perhaps not. At least not yet. To say that the world is in turmoil is an understatement and the same is true of the world of privacy and data protection, which makes predicting the future particularly tricky. But since the urge to plan, budget and prepare for what is likely to happen next is so real, now is a good time to pause, reflect about what’s going on, and make some predictions for 2018.

Posted in Privacy & Security Litigation

U.S. Supreme Court Takes Microsoft Corp. v. United States in Law Enforcement Access Row

Last Monday, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in the Microsoft search warrant case, a case in which Microsoft challenged the U.S. government’s right to use the warrant process to obtain certain emails stored overseas. Some view the upcoming decision as signaling the level of access the U.S. government will have to the growing troves of data U.S.-based technology companies hold about citizens of the world. And regulators in the EU and other jurisdictions may view a reversal of the Second Circuit decision as a negative factor when considering the protections the U.S. government afford their citizens’ data. The case was previously decided twice in Microsoft’s favor in the Second Circuit, which declined to grant en banc review by a 4-4 decision.

Posted in Employment Privacy, International/EU Privacy

European Court Proposes Criteria for Assessing Employee Monitoring Activities

On September 5, the European Court of Human Rights issued a ruling in the case of Bărbulescu v. Romania that affirms employees’ right to privacy in the use of communications tools in the workplace. Although the ruling is strict, it aligns with the positions taken by the national courts of certain European Union Member States (e.g., Germany) and guidance issued by data protection authorities. And the criteria that the ECHR adopts for assessing the lawfulness of monitoring generally aligns with the requirements under the General Data Protection Regulation, which takes full effect on May 25, 2018. In our post, we summarize the ruling and identify key takeaways for companies that monitor workforce use of information systems and tools in the EU.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Russian Data Protection Authority Publishes Privacy Policy Guidance

On 31 July, the Russian data protection authority, Roskomnadzor, issued guidance for data operators on the drafting of privacy policies to comply with Russian data protection law. Russia’s 2006 privacy law – Federal Law No. 152-FZ of 27 July 2006 “On Personal Data” – requires, among other things, that Russian data operators must adopt a privacy policy that describes how they process personal data. This notice requirement is similar to the approach in Europe. Furthermore, data operators shall publish such a policy online when personal data is collected online or otherwise provide unrestricted access to the policy when personal data is collected offline. The guidance – although non-binding and recommendatory in nature – emphasizes the regulator’s compliance expectations and should therefore be taken into account by organizations acting as data operators in Russia.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

UK Government Releases Statement of Intent on Proposed Data Protection Bill

On 7 August 2017, the UK Department for Culture, Media and Sport published its Statement of Intent on a proposed Data Protection Bill, which will replace the current UK Data Protection Act 1998. The Bill is designed to fully implement the two new laws emanating from the EU – the General Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Law Enforcement Directive – in an effort to make the UK’s transition out of the EU as smooth as possible from a data protection perspective and to ensure that both commercial and law enforcement data flows ‘remain uninterrupted after the UK’s exit from the EU’.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

South Korea Joins APEC Cross-Border Privacy Rules System

On Monday, June 12, South Korea became the latest country approved to officially join the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation’s Cross-Border Privacy Rules system. It is the fifth APEC economy to participate in the system, joining the United States, Canada, Japan, and Mexico. To date, twenty companies—including Apple, Cisco, HP, IBM, Rackspace, and Workday—have been certified under CBPR.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

UK to Align Itself with the GDPR Despite Brexit

“A new law will ensure that the United Kingdom retains its world-class regime protecting personal data”. This is today’s strong statement by Her Majesty The Queen reflecting the level of priority given by the UK government to privacy and data protection. Aside from the political controversies surrounding the recent general Election and the prospect of Brexit, the Queen has confirmed that during this Parliament the government intends to pass a new Data Protection Act replacing the existing one.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

UK Parliament Passes New Digital Economy Act

The Digital Economy Bill passed into UK law last Thursday 27 April 2017 amidst the flurry of activity known as the ‘wash up’ period before the dissolution of Parliament and ahead of the early general election in the UK to be held on 8 June. The Digital Economy Act introduces measures to “modernise the UK for enterprise,” and includes plans for public sector data sharing, direct marketing and age verification for online pornography, amongst other measures. An overview of these measures is set forth in this post.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

German Parliament Passes New Federal Data Protection Act

On 27 April 2017 the German Parliament passed an entirely new Federal Data Protection Act. The new BDSG replaces the old BDSG, which has been in force for the last 40 years. The new BDSG shall adapt the German law to the provisions of the EU General Data Protection Regulation. The new BDSG will now form the basis for the adaption of German acts to the GDPR. Further acts concerning special processing situations like social security data protection are likely to follow.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Article 29 Working Party Issues Guidance on Data Protection Impact Assessments

The steady trickle of GDPR guidance from the Article 29 Working Party continues. Fresh from finalising its guidance on data portability, lead supervisory authorities and data protection officers, the Working Party has published draft guidance on data protection impact assessments, the full text of which is available on the Working Party website. Comments can be submitted to the Working Party by 23 May 2017, after which the guidance will be finalised.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

State of the Cyber Nation: UK Government Report on Cybersecurity Breaches

On 19 April 2017, the UK Government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) published a report on cyber security breaches and how they affected UK companies in the last year. The report indicates that a number of UK companies have not implemented comprehensive cybersecurity policies or implemented strong safeguards to protect against cyber attacks. The General Data Protection Regulation — in particular the requirement to ensure all personal data is protected by appropriate technical and organisational measures — provides a real opportunity for any organisation to build a new cyber security strategy. Documenting the decisions taken on these measures will be useful for showing compliance with the new requirements for data protection by design and by default.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Australia Introduces Mandatory Data Breach Notification Scheme

On 13 February 2017, the Australian Senate passed into law the Privacy Amendment Bill 2016. This law amends the primary privacy and data protection legislation in Australia, Privacy Act 1988, to introduce the long-anticipated mandatory data breach notification scheme. Under this scheme, all agencies and businesses that are regulated by the Privacy Act are required to provide notice to the Australian Information Commissioner and affected individuals of certain data breaches that are likely to result in “serious harm.”

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Polish DPA Releases Data Privacy Inspection Plans – Targets Health, Shopping

The Polish Data Protection Authority has just released its inspection plans for 2017. This year, the GIODO has decided to target its review of compliance with data protection laws on the health services sector, as well as on the consumer sector, with particular attention to certain profiling activities taking place in stores and shopping malls.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Russia Increases Fines for Violations of Data Protection Laws

On 7 February 2017, the Russian President signed into law a bill introducing amendments to the Russian Code on Administrative Offences that increases the amount of the fines imposed for violating Russian data protection laws and differentiates the relevant offences’ types. The greatest increase raises maximum fines for certain violations from RUB 10,000 to 75,000 (approx. USD 170 to 1,260).The law will come into force on 1 July 2017.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Changes in Japan Privacy Law to Take Effect in Mid-2017; Key Regulator Provides Compliance Insights

Recent changes to Japan’s Act on the Protection of Personal Information and the establishment of a new Personal Information Protection Commission have raised questions about how the world’s third-largest economy plans to implement new domestic requirements and engage internationally on cross-border data transfers, APEC, new technologies, and more. Hogan Lovells recently hosted some of Japan’s senior data privacy regulators and advisors for a special briefing in our Washington, D.C. offices.