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HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: California

Posted in News & Events

Webinar Invitation – CCPA Draft Regulations: What You Need to Know

Please join Hogan Lovells on October 17 for a webinar discussion of the much-anticipated proposed CCPA regulations released by the California Attorney General. The Hogan Lovells team will discuss the proposed requirements and how they would impact privacy notices, individual rights, financial incentive programs, and contracting strategies. We will also discuss steps you can take to develop reasonable and defensible CCPA compliance strategies by January 1, 2020.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

The Results Are in: Modest Changes to CCPA Await the Governor’s Signature

Since the California Consumer Privacy Act’s hasty passage in June last year and minor changes last September, the CCPA has vexed businesses working on compliance. Among many practical challenges, the CCPA often includes inconsistent or ambiguous requirements that have been an obstacle to implementing clear compliance strategies. Businesses, some academics, and various legislators thought that further amendments were needed to make the CCPA work effectively and accomplish its objectives. Over the past several months, the California legislature debated several amendments, eventually passing five bills, which now sit on the Governor’s desk. These bills collectively do not provide the sweeping changes sought by businesses. Instead amendments make minor tweaks and postpone for a year some of the more challenging requirements.

Posted in News & Events

Now Available: Webinar – Operationalizing the California Consumer Privacy Act – Key Decisions and Compliance Strategies

On June 20, 2019, Hogan Lovells partners Mark Brennan and Bret Cohen discussed in great detail the impact of the law, explained key definitions, and offered practical guidance on how to navigate it during the webinar, “Operationalizing the California Consumer Privacy Act.” More than 600 live attendees participated and were able to hear Mark and Bret cover how to determine whether businesses are covered, how to account for opt-outs from sales to third parties, the content and timing of CCPA notices, how to apply the CCPA’s exceptions, and more.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

CCPA Amendments Advance through California Assembly

A number of legislative proposals seeking to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act are moving forward following an April 23 hearing before the California Assembly’s Committee on Privacy and Consumer Protection in which the bills were approved. The bills will now advance to the Assembly’s Appropriations Committee before being voted on by the full Assembly and potentially advancing to the California Senate for consideration.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

Efforts to Expand CCPA’s Private Right of Action Remain in Question

The California legislature is considering significant amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act ahead of the law’s January 1, 2020 implementation date. Of particular note has been the potential for CCPA amendments to expand the private right of action beyond violations of businesses’ duty to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures to instead cover violations of any CCPA rights.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

Beyond FERPA: The California Consumer Privacy Act’s New Rules for Privacy in the Education Sector

In June of 2018, California passed the California Consumer Privacy Act, which seeks to give consumers additional safeguards regarding their personal information. The CCPA will become effective January of 2020 and may impact companies in the education sector, including the larger education technology companies. While the CCPA does not apply to nonprofit educational institutions, it may apply to certain for-profit educational institutions, third-party service providers, and others in the education space. If an educational entity meets the threshold requirements below or it processes information on behalf of such an entity, it should prepare for CCPA implementation by January 2020.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

CCPA Update: CA AG Backs Bill to Expand Private Right of Action and Remove Cure Period

A bill introduced to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (“CCPA” or the “Act”) could greatly expand the risks to businesses that collect the personal information of California consumers. Senate Bill 561 (“SB 561”) would expand the CCPA’s private right of action to any violation of a consumer’s CCPA rights, remove the existing 30-day cure period, and eliminate businesses’ right to consult the AG’s office regarding compliance. SB 561 would not impact the CCPA’s current effective date of January 1, 2020.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Consumer Privacy Act: The Challenge Ahead – The CCPA’s “Reasonable” Security Requirement

Much of the focus on the California Consumer Protection Act (“CCPA”) has been on the new rights that it affords California consumers, including the rights to access, delete, and opt out of the sale of their personal information. But arguably the greatest risk to covered businesses involves data security, as the CCPA creates for the first time a private right of action with substantial statutory penalties for breaches involving California consumers’ personal information. This installment of the Hogan Lovells’ CCPA series explains the CCPA’s security requirement and consequences for non-compliance, and describes security controls that most organizations can implement to mitigate this risk.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California DoJ Sets March 8 Deadline for CCPA Pre-Rulemaking Comments

The California Department of Justice has announced a March 8, 2019 deadline for submitting written pre-rulemaking comments on the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The March 8 deadline is an extension from the previously set end-of-February deadline. Pursuant to section 1798.185(a) of the CCPA, the California Attorney General (AG) is obligated to solicit broad public participation and adopt regulations to further the purposes of the CCPA. The CCPA sets out seven specific areas for AG rulemaking.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Department of Justice to Hold Six Public Forums on the CCPA

The California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and the California Department of Justice will hold six public forums about the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) that are open to all members of the public. These public forums are being held pursuant to Section 1798.185 of the CCPA, which requires the Attorney General to “solicit broad public participation and adopt regulations to further the purposes” of the CCPA.

Posted in Employment Privacy

California Consumer Privacy Act: The Challenge Ahead – CCPA and Employee Data

The application of the California Consumer Protection Act of 2018 (“CCPA”) to employee data has been the subject of much debate since the first version of the bill was introduced on June 21, 2018 (just days prior to its enactment on June 28). Under a plain language reading of the CCPA, the law likely applies to employee data. However, it is unclear whether the California legislature intended that result. There is no clarity to be found in the general statutory structure, the legislative history, legislative responses to advocate letters, or the technical amendments signed into law on September 23. As part of our ongoing series on the CCPA, this post lays out why the issue of CCPA applicability to employees is controversial and nevertheless offers potential strategies to address CCPA compliance requirements as they may relate to personnel records.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Passes First-Of-Its-Kind Law Focused on Internet of Things Cybersecurity

Late last month, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the first US Internet of Things (IoT) cybersecurity legislation: Senate Bill 327 and Assembly Bill 1906. Starting on January 1, 2020, manufacturers of regulated connected devices are required to equip such devices with “reasonable security features” designed to protect a connected device and any information it holds from “unauthorized access, destruction, use, modification, or disclosure.” This legislation was prompted by what the bill’s sponsor viewed as a “lack of security features on internet connected devices undermin[ing] the privacy and security of California’s consumers.”

Posted in Health Privacy/HIPAA

California Consumer Privacy Act: The Challenge Ahead – Four Key Considerations for Health and Life Sciences Companies

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) adds another set of privacy requirements for health and life sciences companies.  Managing the interaction of these new requirements with existing obligations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), California’s Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (CMIA), and other health privacy laws will continue to be an area of focus in the health privacy community for years to come. In the latest installment of the CCPA blog series, we describe these issues and outline four important steps health and life sciences companies may consider to assess the CCPA’s operational impact.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Consumer Privacy Act: The Challenge Ahead – A Comparison of 10 Key Aspects of The GDPR and The CCPA

As the most comprehensive privacy law to be enacted in the United States thus far, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) has inevitably invited comparisons to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). At first glance, it is clear that the drafters of the CCPA (and the ballot measure that spurred its passage) drew inspiration from the GDPR. However, the CCPA is not a carbon copy of the GDPR, and a GDPR compliance program will not automatically meet the requirements of the CCPA. As businesses begin their CCPA compliance efforts, awareness of these laws’ similarities and differences will be key to creating efficient and effective compliance programs that capitalize on prior GDPR compliance work but also address the unique nuances of the CCPA.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Consumer Privacy Act: The Challenge Ahead – Consumer Litigation and the CCPA: What to Expect

This post discusses litigation exposure that businesses collecting personal information about California consumers should consider in the wake of the California Legislature’s passage of the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA). The CCPA creates a limited private right of action for suits arising out of data breaches.  At the same time, it also precludes individuals from using it as a basis for a private right of action under any other statute.  Both features of the law have potentially far-reaching implications and will garner the attention of an already relentless plaintiffs’ bar when it goes into effect January 1, 2020.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Consumer Privacy Act: The Challenge Ahead — Introduction to Hogan Lovells’ Blog Series

We have heard the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) called many things since its enactment on June 28, 2018. Our experience to date has confirmed the compliance challenge ahead for organizations that engage with the residents of the world’s fifth-largest economy. We will explore the ramifications for businesses of this seminal legislation in this multi-part series, “The Challenge Ahead” authored by members of Hogan Lovells’ CCPA team. In this first installment, we describe recent activity to enact so-called “technical” amendments to the CCPA.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

Now Available: California Consumer Privacy Act: What you need to know now webinar recording and slides

On July 24, members of the Hogan Lovells global privacy team presented a webinar on the new California Consumer Privacy Act, a ground-breaking new data privacy law that some are calling the United States’ answer to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation. In this post, we provide links to the recorded webinar and slide deck.

Posted in News & Events

Webinar Invitation — California Consumer Privacy Act: What You Need to Know Now

On June 28, 2018, California’s governor signed Assembly Bill 375, a ground-breaking new data privacy law that some are calling the United States’ answer to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation. Particularly in light of California’s status as the world’s 5th largest economy, many are wondering how the new California Consumer Privacy Act will affect them. Please join members of the Hogan Lovells global privacy team for a live webinar on July 24 to learn what you should be focusing on now.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Enacts Sweeping New Comprehensive Privacy Legislation

California continues to be a first mover in privacy in the United States, enacting the US’s toughest and most comprehensive privacy legislation on Thursday, June 28, 2018. Unlike existing state and federal privacy legislation that has generally focused on specific sectors or privacy issues, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (AB 375), applies broadly to businesses that collect personal information about California consumers and aims to create significant new consumer privacy rights. In doing so, it creates significant new obligations for businesses.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

California Consumer Privacy Bill Fast-Tracked to Replace November Ballot Initiative

On June 22, California lawmakers announced Assembly Bill 375, a broad-based consumer privacy bill that is intended to serve as an alternative to the California Consumer Privacy Act, a far-reaching consumer privacy initiative that is on track to be on the California ballot this November. The chief sponsor of the CCPA, Alastair Mactaggart, has stated that he will withdraw the initiative from the ballot if AB 375 is passed this week.

Posted in Cybersecurity & Data Breaches

“Reasonable Security” Becomes Reasonably Clear to the California Attorney General

A growing number of state and federal laws require organizations to implement reasonable security safeguards to protect personal information. But what constitutes reasonable data security? This question has vexed organizations and spurred a considerable amount of litigation. On February 16, 2016, the California Attorney General’s Office released its 2016 Data Breach Report, which for the first time provides a listing of safeguards that the Attorney General views as constituting reasonable information security practices. Despite being focused on California, the Report’s recommendations are likely to have an impact far beyond the borders of the Golden State.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, Privacy & Security Litigation

California Legislature Advances UAS Legislation

For the past several years, California’s Legislature has actively sought to regulate unmanned aerial systems, including, but not only, through privacy-related legislation.. In the 2014 session, one bill passed and was signed by Governor Brown. It bans the use of UAS to capture images or record voices of people without their permission, and is widely regarded as an anti-paparazzi law, aimed at protecting the many celebrities – and their children – in California’s entertainment industry. However, the wording of the bill more broadly protects individuals’ privacy from visual or audio recording in a manner that is “offensive to a reasonable person … under circumstances in which the [person] had a reasonable expectation of privacy” if the recording could not have been made without either trespassing or using special equipment. The bill is codified at California Civil Code section 1708.8. In the 2015 session, the California Legislature introduced five more bills, covering a range of issues.

Posted in Cybersecurity & Data Breaches

Hogan Lovells’ IAPP Tracker Post Highlights State Data Security Laws

Is data security legislation coming to a state near you? With data breaches continuing to make the headlines, 60 Minutes reporting that breaches are inevitable and federal legislation seeming unlikely, consumers and advocates may press state lawmakers to address data security. We have already seen state data breach notification laws proliferate following California’s enactment of the first such law in 2002. We may see data security laws spread in a similar fashion. In this post, we look at current and proposed state data security laws and consider their potential impact.