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Category Archives: International/EU Privacy

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Posted in International/EU Privacy

EDPB Advises on Lawful Grounds for Processing Personal Data in Clinical Trials

With the coming into effect of the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), those conducting clinical trials in the EU face a complex set of rules ranging from lawful grounds for processing and transparency to restrictions on data transfers and secondary uses. To assist with this task the European Commission is in the process of adopting a Q&A document on which it has sought the advice from the European Data Protection Board (“EDPB”).

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EU and Japan Create World’s Largest Area of Safe Data Transfers

On 23 January, the European Commission announced that it had adopted an adequacy decision in relation to Japan, to enter into force immediately. The mutual agreement, which covers Japan’s 127m citizens as well as the whole of the EU, allows personal data to be transferred between Japan and the EU without the need for additional safeguards such as Standard Contractual Clauses, and creates the largest area of safe data transfers in the world.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Brexit – A Data Protection Action Plan

Right now, the whole of the U.K. appears to be on the same spot looking over a precipice. However, this is not the moment to be blind. As politicians struggle to find a magic formula for a prosperous Brexit, businesses are stepping up their efforts to mitigate the damage of a possible “no-deal Brexit.” The data protection community is no different. The proposed withdrawal agreement would have preserved the status quo in data protection terms, at least until the end of the transition period in December 2020. However, if the U.K. leaves the EU without a deal, the implications for international data flows and privacy compliance generally will be severe. Therefore, British pragmatism demands an urgent and thorough approach to preparing for the eventuality of a no-deal Brexit.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Brazil Creates a Data Protection Authority

Although Brazil’s new General Data Privacy Law (LGPD) significantly expands Brazil’s data protection framework and places the country among one of the few jurisdictions to provide similar data privacy protections as those offered in the European Union, the new law did not create a data protection authority. On 28 December 2018, outgoing President Michel Temer signed Medida Provisória no. 869/18, a last-minute executive order that made important changes to the LGPD and most notably created the Brazilian National Data Protection Authority (ANPD).

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Are You Ready for Brazil’s New Data Protection Law?

The Brazilian General Data Protection Law (“Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados” or “LGPD”), passed by Congress on 14 August 2018, will come into effect on 15 February 2020. The new data protection law significantly improves Brazil’s existing legal framework by regulating the use of personal data by the public and private sectors. Very similar to the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) implemented in the European Union, the LGPD imposes strict regulations on the collection, use, processing, and storage of electronic and physical personal data. In conjunction with the passing of the LGPD, the National Data Protection Authority will be created in order to adequately implement the new legislation.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

UK Government Aims for Data Protection Continuity Despite No Deal Brexit Prospect

Amid the constitutional and political uncertainties surrounding the Brexit process, the UK Government has provided welcome assurance on the data protection front. Guidance issued by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) confirms how UK data protection law will work in the event the UK leaves the EU without a deal. Whilst the Government still regards a No Deal Brexit as “unlikely”, given the extremely severe implications of that scenario for transfers of personal data into and out of the UK, the DCMS confirmation is hugely helpful in terms of the preparations needed for that eventuality.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EDPB’s Common Sense Approach to the GDPR’s Territorial Scope

The EU General Data Protection Regulation is now a fully functioning six-month old creature, which has brought with it significant evolutionary changes. One of the most notable innovations of the new European data protection framework is its ambitious extra-territorial application. The introduction of brand new grounds for the applicability of the law was a major development. As a result, and as essential as this is, the GDPR’s territorial scope of application has become one of the most difficult issues to pin down. Therefore, the publication of the European Data Protection Board’s draft guidelines on the territorial scope of the GDPR marks an important milestone in understanding the implications of this influential framework.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

DP Impact Assessments: EDPB Differs Slightly from ICO Position

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has recently published its Opinion on the (United Kingdom) Information Commissioner’s list of processing activities which would require a Data Protection Impact Assessment under the GDPR. In its Opinion, the EDPB appears to be moving away from the idea that processing of genetic or location data, on its own, might be enough to trigger the mandatory DPIA requirements of the GDPR. This news will perhaps come as a relief to organi­sations currently struggling to come to grips with the “new” DPIA process and the resources and time that it demands. But, should we be surprised by the EDPB’s Opinion and will it have a significant impact in practice on the way organisations consider and conduct DPIAs?

Posted in Cybersecurity & Data Breaches, International/EU Privacy

Data Protection Authority of Baden-Württemberg Issues First German Fine Under the GDPR

In the first fine issued by a German data protection authority under the GDPR, on 21 November 2018 the authority of the German state of Baden-Württemberg (“LfDI”) imposed a fine of Euro 20,000 on a social media provider for a violation of its data security obligations under Art. 32 of the GDPR. The company’s very good cooperation with the LfDI was key to avoiding a higher level of fines.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Data Protection and the Draft EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement: Ten Initial Conclusions

The draft text of the EU-UK withdrawal agreement was published by the UK Government and the European Union yesterday, providing some of the first concrete indicators of the possible direction of travel in the area of data protection. In this post, we discuss ten initial conclusions from the draft text.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Update: Vietnam’s New Cybersecurity Law

On June 12, 2018, the Vietnamese National Assembly passed the Law on Cybersecurity (the “Cybersecurity Law”), which will take effect on January 1, 2019. Among other aims, the law seeks to regulate data processing methods of technology companies that operate in Vietnam and restrict the Internet connections of users who post “prohibited” content. The seemingly broad application of the law’s provisions understandably caused concern among foreign tech companies serving Vietnamese end-users with fears of mandatory data localization and requirements to establish a physical presence in Vietnam.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Busting the Myth: Compliance with the ‘Gold Standard’ of the GDPR Does Not Buy You a ‘Free Pass’ Under China’s New Personal Information Guidelines

On December 29, 2017, the Standardization Administration of China, jointly with the PRC General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, issued the Information Security Technology – Personal Information Security Specification, which officially came into effect on May 1, 2018. The Specification has, in very practical terms, become an important point of reference in evaluating the complex overlay of data protection compliance requirements found in the Cyber Security Law, the Law on the Protection of Consumer Rights and Interests, the e-Commerce Law and other enactments and measures.

Posted in International/EU Privacy, Privacy & Security Litigation

U.S. Court Allows Video Deposition Over EU Deponent’s Privacy Objections

A U.S. court has recently ruled that an EU citizen’s privacy rights and the GDPR do not trump a U.S. litigant’s right to obtain discovery, including video-taped depositions. In d’Amico Dry d.a.c. v. Nikka Finance, Inc., CA 18-0284-KD-MU, Dkt. No. 140 (Adm. S.D. Ala. Oct. 19, 2018), a federal magistrate denied an EU citizen’s motion […]

Posted in International/EU Privacy

French Data Protection Authority’s Latest Newsletter Includes Assessment of First Four Months of GDPR & Several Guidelines

The French Data Protection Authority (the CNIL) published its assessment of the first four months of GDPR and several guidelines, including one on how to make a GDPR compliant blockchain. Since the Data Protection Act’s implementation, the CNIL has been very active in guiding French citizens on how to comply with the new legal framework and warning them about threats from new technologies.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Will the UK Meet the EU Adequacy Test?

Unless there is a political earthquake (some would say a miracle) Brexit will happen on 29 March 2019. Upon Brexit the UK will cease to be an EU Member State and become a so-called ‘third country’. As a result, UK-based organisations, which in the context of transfers of personal data to countries outside the EU have always been exporters, will become importers of data originating from the EU. This is a serious concern because transfers of personal data from the EU to third countries are severely restricted. So a key UK Government objective from day one has been to ensure that the UK is regarded as an adequate jurisdiction, which would allow unconstrained transfers of personal data from the EU. But will it be?

Posted in International/EU Privacy

GDPR Italian Implementing Decree Has Been Published

On September 4, the Legislative Decree no. 101 of August 10, 2018 for the national implementation of General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679 was published in the Official Journal. The Decree integrates the provisions of the GDPR, that were previously left to the autonomy of the Member States and will enter into force on September 19, 2018.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Data Protection in the Event of a “No Deal Brexit”

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (‘DDCMS’) has today released guidance on “Data protection if there’s no Brexit deal”, which is part of its preparations for if there is a “no deal” scenario when the Article 50 negotiating period comes to an end on 29 March 2019. The UK will become a “third country” on its exit from the European Union, which means that unhindered cross-border transfers of data will no longer automatically be able to take place between the UK and the EU. The guidance confirms that, given the “unprecedented alignment” between the UK and EU data protection regimes, the UK would continue to allow transfers of data from the UK to the EU at the point of exit. However, the Commission has made it clear that they would not make a decision on adequacy until the UK is a third country (that is, after 29 March 2018), and its procedure for reaching a decision typically lasts several months.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

India’s Draft Personal Data Protection Bill, 2018: Charting the “Fourth Way”

India’s Committee of Experts has submitted a draft Data Protection Bill for review by the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology. The Bill represents an important milestone for India, which has yet to enact comprehensive, principles-based data protection regulation, lagging a trend set in recent years by Singapore, the Philippines and others in the region playing catch up to Hong Kong and Japan, which have both had such regulation in place for years now.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Who Will Get the First Big GDPR Fine and How to Avoid It?

At the Privacy Laws and Business’ International Conference, Eduardo Ustaran evaluated the sorts of activities likely to prompt regulators into exercising their increased fining powers under the GDPR. In this post, we provide links to both a video of his presentation at the conference as well as a detailed report about his presentation.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Top Human Rights Court Denies Right to be Forgotten in Old Murder Case

On June 28, 2018 the European Court of Human Rights decided that the German Supreme Court had correctly denied two individuals their “right to be forgotten” requests in connection with press archives relating to a 1991 murder. The German Supreme court reasoned that the interests of the public in having access to the information outweighed the interference with the plaintiff’s privacy rights. Upon hearing the case, the ECtHR agreed and found that Germany had correctly applied the balancing test relating to right to be forgotten claims.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

The Future of International Data Transfers

With the current focus on the coming into effect of the EU General Data Protection Regulation, one could (almost) be forgiven for forgetting about the question of international data flows. However, given the political and legal developments currently affecting the future of international data transfers, that would be a very serious strategic mistake. Legitimising data globalisation remains a top business priority in our uber-digitised world. The coming of age of cloud-based services, the continuous advance of mobile communications and the push by developed and developing countries to reach a global market have made international data transfers more essential than ever. At the same time, the level of regulation affecting those transfers is becoming more impenetrable and politically charged. Against this background, what are the issues that need to be taken into account to develop a solid global data flows legal strategy?

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Cookie Consent Is the New Panic

Judging by the number of calls and the intensity of the discussions about how to comply with the cookie consent requirement in a post-GDPR world, this issue has become a top worry for organisations and data protection officers. Partly due to the visibility of the mechanisms used to collect this consent, and partly due to the potential implications of operating a website without cookies, the dilemma around what solution to deploy has become a serious business decision. Different business stakeholders are often at odds with each other and matters are getting escalated to decision makers who had never been involved in the technically complex and largely misunderstood world of cookies. The tension is rising and yet, no approach has emerged as the preferred one among all involved. So everyone is getting anxious to find a way to do what they have always done and comply with the law. Is this panic justified?