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Tag Archives: federal trade commission

Posted in Consumer Privacy

FTC ALJ: Embarrassment/Emotional Harm and Risk of Harm Does Not Satisfy “Substantial Consumer Injury” Prong of Unfairness

On November 13, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission’s Chief Administrative Law Judge dismissed an FTC administrative complaint based on LabMD’s alleged failure to provide “reasonable and appropriate” security for personal information maintained on its computers. The ALJ concluded that the complaint counsel failed to prove that LabMD’s alleged practices constituted an unfair trade practice. Specifically, according to the ALJ’s initial decision, complaint counsel failed to prove by a preponderance of the evidence the first prong of the three-part unfairness test – that the alleged unreasonable conduct caused or is likely to cause substantial injury to consumers as required by Section 5(n) of the FTC Act. The case is notable for being the first data security case tried before an ALJ and only one of two instances where a company has fought the FTC’s decision to move forward with an enforcement action based on allegations that a company has engaged in unfair practices because of inadequate data security practices. Companies have otherwise voluntarily entered into consent decrees without admitting liability. In the other instance where a company did not capitulate to an FTC enforcement action, Wyndham moved to dismiss the FTC’s lawsuit against it in federal district court based on lack of jurisdiction. Wyndham lost in the district court and on an interlocutory appeal the federal court of appeals upheld that ruling, but remanded the case to district court for a trial on the merits which will assess whether Wyndham’s alleged unreasonable data security practices meet the unfairness factors in section 5(n) of the FTC Act. Accordingly, as the ALJ did here, the court in Wyndham will consider whether the practices and the data breaches there caused or were likely to cause substantial consumer injury under the first prong of an unfairness inquiry

Posted in Consumer Privacy, News & Events

Upcoming DC Program Explores Where We Are Headed with Section 5 of the FTC Act

Data privacy and security regulators don’t always agree. Take a look at the Federal Trade Commission for example. In recent years, FTC commissioners have disagreed about the role that cost-benefit analyses should play and the types of consumer harms that should be considered in the FTC’s data privacy and security enforcement actions. For organizations that rely on the collection and use of consumer information, understanding the different viewpoints at the FTC and how those viewpoints may influence future enforcement is vital to evaluating risk. On Thursday, November 5, 2015, the Future of Privacy Forum will look at those issues as it celebrates its new home and its new partnership with Washington & Lee University School Law by hosting a panel discussion addressing the Future of Section 5 of the FTC Act. Panelists David Vladeck (former FTC Consumer Bureau Director David Vladeck) and James Cooper (former Acting Director of the Office of Policy Planning) will look at key Section 5 issues.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

The Law of Securing Consumer Data on Networked Computers

The status of consumer data security law in the United States is at a crossroads. Last week, the White House released a discussion draft of its Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights Act of 2015, which would require businesses collecting personal information to maintain safeguards reasonably designed to ensure the security of that information. And yesterday, the Third Circuit held oral argument in FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp., in which the district court last April denied Wyndham’s challenge to the Federal Trade Commission’s data security enforcement efforts.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

The Hidden Mini-Dissents in the Data Broker Report of Federal Trade Commissioner Wright

On May 27, the Federal Trade Commission issued a report on the data broker industry that found data brokers operate with a ”fundamental lack of transparency.” The commission unanimously recommended that Congress consider enacting legislation to make data broker practices more visible to consumers and to give consumers greater control over the immense amounts of personal information about them that are collected and shared by data brokers. Not well-recognized at the time were a number of concerns, mini-dissents if you will, expressed by Federal Trade Commissioner Josh Wright. I recently asked Commissioner Wright some questions about his “dissent by footnotes.”

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy

FTC Settles Actions Against Twelve Companies for Improperly Representing Safe Harbor Certification

Less than two months after the European Commission issued a report urging the Federal Trade Commission to step up enforcement of the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor framework, the FTC announced a settlement with twelve companies — including an Internet service provider, makers of consumer goods, three National Football League teams, and a developer of mobile applications — over allegations that they deceptively claimed to be certified under Safe Harbor. According to the FTC, each of these companies represented that they maintained a active Safe Harbor certification with the U.S. Department of Commerce when in fact they did not.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, Financial Privacy

FTC Issues New Red Flags Rule Guidance

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) recently issued a revised guidance (“Guide”) on the Red Flags Rule (“Rule”) (see “Fighting Identity Theft with the Red Flags Rule: A How-To Guide for Business”). The Red Flags Rule requires certain businesses to develop, implement and administer an identity theft protection program. The purpose of this Guide is to […]

Posted in Consumer Privacy

GAO Calls for Additional Federal Action in Mobile Privacy Report

On October 11, 2012, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued a report titled “Mobile Device Location Data: Additional Federal Actions Could Help Protect Consumer Privacy.” Requested by Sen. Al Franken (D-MN), the Report recognizes the efforts of Federal agencies to protect consumer privacy when using mobile devices but calls for additional action

Posted in Consumer Privacy, Cybersecurity & Data Breaches

FTC Provides Guidance to (All) Mobile App Developers

Following up on a public workshop held earlier this year, today the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a set of truth-in-advertising and privacy guidelines for mobile device application (app) developers. Titled “Marketing Your Mobile App: Get it Right From the Start,” the guidelines provide an overview of key issues for all app developers to consider.

Posted in Cybersecurity & Data Breaches

FTC Reaches Settlements Over P2P Data Breaches

The Federal Trade Commission yesterday announced settlements with two companies over security breaches caused by peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing software. The settlements require the companies to establish and maintain comprehensive information security programs and to undergo data security audits by independent auditors every other year for 20 years.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

FTC Releases Final Privacy Report

Today the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued its long-awaited privacy report, “Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: Recommendations for Businesses and Policymakers,” which is intended to articulate “best practices” for companies that collect and use consumer data, and to assist Congress as it considers new privacy legislation.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

FTC Announces Settlement with Facebook

The Federal Trade Commission this afternoon announced a proposed consent decree with the prominent social network Facebook, settling allegations that Facebook violated Section 5 of the FTC Act by failing to live up to representations made to consumers regarding its privacy practices. Among other remedial measures, the FTC required Facebook to obtain independent privacy compliance audits for the next 20 years. Along with the FTC’s recent consent decrees with Google and Twitter, the FTC now effectively has regulatory oversight over the privacy and data security practices of the three most prominent social networking companies in the United States.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

FTC: Opt-Out Should Mean Opt-Out

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) yesterday announced a settlement with Chitika, Inc. over its failure to honor consumers’ choice in contravention of representations made in its online privacy policy. The announcement is notable in that it comes in the wake of the FTC’s December 2010 Preliminary Staff Report and is the FTC’s first consent settlement relating to […]

Posted in News & Events

Hogan & Hartson Prepares Guidance on Business Compliance with FTC Identity Theft Red Flags Rule

Businesses may be facing their last chance to comply with the FTC identity theft Red Flags Rule as the compliance deadline was extended over the Summer to November 1, 2009. On July 29, 2009, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced that it will delay enforcement of its identity theft “Red Flags Rule”until November 1, 2009. This is the third […]