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HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: data protection

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Australia Introduces Mandatory Data Breach Notification Scheme

On 13 February 2017, the Australian Senate passed into law the Privacy Amendment Bill 2016. This law amends the primary privacy and data protection legislation in Australia, Privacy Act 1988, to introduce the long-anticipated mandatory data breach notification scheme. Under this scheme, all agencies and businesses that are regulated by the Privacy Act are required to provide notice to the Australian Information Commissioner and affected individuals of certain data breaches that are likely to result in “serious harm.”

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Polish DPA Releases Data Privacy Inspection Plans – Targets Health, Shopping

The Polish Data Protection Authority has just released its inspection plans for 2017. This year, the GIODO has decided to target its review of compliance with data protection laws on the health services sector, as well as on the consumer sector, with particular attention to certain profiling activities taking place in stores and shopping malls.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Russia Increases Fines for Violations of Data Protection Laws

On 7 February 2017, the Russian President signed into law a bill introducing amendments to the Russian Code on Administrative Offences that increases the amount of the fines imposed for violating Russian data protection laws and differentiates the relevant offences’ types. The greatest increase raises maximum fines for certain violations from RUB 10,000 to 75,000 (approx. USD 170 to 1,260).The law will come into force on 1 July 2017.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Changes in Japan Privacy Law to Take Effect in Mid-2017; Key Regulator Provides Compliance Insights

Recent changes to Japan’s Act on the Protection of Personal Information and the establishment of a new Personal Information Protection Commission have raised questions about how the world’s third-largest economy plans to implement new domestic requirements and engage internationally on cross-border data transfers, APEC, new technologies, and more. Hogan Lovells recently hosted some of Japan’s senior data privacy regulators and advisors for a special briefing in our Washington, D.C. offices.

Posted in News & Events

GDPR Implementation Guide Available

We are pleased to announce that Hogan Lovells Frankfurt-based Partner Tim Wybitul has published a handbook – EU-Datenschutz-Grundverordnung im Unternehmen: Praxisleitfaden – to assist organizations with compliance with the European General Data Protection Regulation. Written in German, the handbook includes plain-language summaries of GDPR requirements as well as project-planning and other checklists and examples to aid companies in complying with the Regulation. The handbook draws upon case studies to present lessons learned by several companies in their efforts to develop GDPR-compliant programs and is designed to be a useful resource for companies of all sizes.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Philippines Finalizes Data Privacy Act Implementing Rules

The Philippines’ first comprehensive data protection law, the Data Privacy Act of 2012, took effect on 8 September 2012. The Act mandated the creation of a National Privacy Commission to implement, enforce and monitor compliance with the Act, with one of its duties to promulgate rules and regulations to effectively implement the provisions of the Act. It was not until March 2016 that the NPC was officially formed, and soon after issued draft implementing rules and regulations of the Act. Following a period of public consultation, the implementing rules and regulations were finalised and formally promulgated on 24 August 2016 and will come into effect today, 9 September 2016.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Recording and Deck from Webinar: Privacy Shield: What You Need to Know

Thank you to everyone who participated in last week’s webinar “Privacy Shield: What You Need to Know,” in which we explored how companies demonstrate compliance with the Privacy Shield principles, what it takes to move from Safe Harbor to Privacy Shield, and more. A copy of the slide deck and recorded webinar are now available on our blog.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Julie Brill Advocates in Support of Privacy Shield

The free flow of data is essential to an ever-growing segment of the global economy. Yet some policymakers and advocates, citing privacy concerns, have called for shutting off the faucet and restricting data flow, to the detriment of European consumers and European businesses, both small and large. After much debate, a major European court opinion, and at least one act of Congress to address the issue, a solution is at hand that will enhance real, enforceable privacy protections on both sides of the Atlantic.

Posted in News & Events

July 2016 Privacy and Cybersecurity Events

Please join us for July 2016 events and speaking engagements led by members of the Hogan Lovells Privacy and Cybersecurity team, detailed in this post.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

A Way Forward for UK Data Protection

The people of the UK have spoken and our collective choice is to leave the European Union. Some are dreading the likely tsunami of economic hardship. Others are excited about what may lie ahead. Most of us are shocked. But as numbing as the verdict of the UK electorate may be, there are crucial political, legal and economic decisions to be made. The ‘To Do’ list of the UK government will be overwhelming, not least because of the dramatic implications that each of the items on the list will have for the future of the country and indeed the world. Steering the economy will be a number one priority and with that, the direction of travel of the digital economy – which, at the end of the day, is one of the pillars of prosperity in the UK and everywhere else.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

CNIL’s New Role: Overseeing Website Blocking

In an April 15, 2016 report, the French Data Protection Authority, the CNIL, provided details about its little-known responsibility as overseer of the French police’s website-blocking powers. The French legislature gave the CNIL this new role in a November 13, 2014 law designed to enhance French police powers against terrorism. The 2014 law increased French police and intelligence agencies’ powers to collect data without a court order. A lesser-known aspect of the November 2014 law is the provision that allows the French police to order ISPs to block websites that either provoke terrorist acts or support (provide an “apologia” or defense for) terrorism. When the French police identify online content that violates these rules, they may order ISPs to block access. The police also have this power with regard to child pornography. Search engines can also be ordered to delist content from search results.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

What Will be the Impact of the New EU Data Protection Regulation on the UK’s Freedom of Information Act?

Undoubtedly one of the more mind-bending exemptions to apply under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) is the exemption for personal information (s.40) (although sections 30 and 36 are also up there!). This is partly due to s. 40’s close link with the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA). Not one to hog the limelight, the DPA has typically been cited in past litigation as a secondary or even tertiary issue to the main action when there is a claim for breach of confidence or breach of privacy. This led to a scarcity of judicial rulings on the DPA prior to the FOIA. However, in the Tribunal and higher court decisions flowing from the FOIA, certain aspects of the DPA have frequently been examined when public authorities seek to rely on the s. 40 exemption. Consequently there have been a number of rulings on the scope of personal data and on the ‘legitimate interests’ ground as a legal basis for disclosing such information. These rulings have been based on the DPA which itself implements the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC. But the Directive is due to be replaced by an EU Regulation in the next few years. What will this mean for how the s. 40 exemption under FOIA is interpreted?

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EU Data Protection Supervisor’s Workshop Examines Role of Privacy in Merger Reviews and Competition Investigations

In a recent client alert, Hogan Lovells partners from the firm’s London and Washington, D.C. offices highlighted key takeaways for businesses following the European Data Protection Supervisor’s Workshop on Privacy, Consumers, Competition, and Big Data. The workshop, hosted by EDPS in the European Parliament in Brussels on 2 June 2014, discussed the technological advances and market for ‘big data’ analytics and the policy implications for the fields of data protection, competition and consumer protection of the rapidly expanding digital economy in the EU and in other regions, particularly the in US. Around 70 experts attended, including representatives from the European regulators and the US Federal Trade Commission.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy

EU LIBE Committee Adopts EU Data Protection Compromises; Reform Package Set for Parliamentary Vote

The EU Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (“LIBE”) voted on Monday to adopt its report on the draft General Data Protection Regulation and the separate Directive for the law enforcement sector. This vote sets out the Parliament’s position for its negotiations with the Council and Commission (known as the “trialogue” stage). The Committee aims to have a plenary Parliamentary vote in March before the Parliamentary elections.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy

China’s Regulation on Personal Data Use by Commercial Websites Takes Effect Sept. 1

On September 1, China’s Provisions on the Protection of the Personal Information of Telecommunications and Internet Users will come into force, affecting a wide range of consumer-facing websites, including corporate sites, product information sites, and social media pages. This post examines some of the requirements of the Provisions, and provides a link to a comprehensive Hogan Lovells Corporate Alert describing recent privacy-related legislative developments in China.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

European Court Adviser: Right to Be Forgotten Can Infringe Freedom of Expression

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) is considering a critical case regarding the “right to be forgotten” and the application of EU data protection law to Internet intermediaries. The case involves a Spanish individual who is seeking to require Google to delete references to newspaper articles mentioning his prior involvement in debt collection proceedings from its search results. The ECJ’s adviser, Advocate General Niilo Jääskinen, recently issued a non-binding opinion stating that although EU law should apply to Google, the company should not be deemed a “data controller” for its search engine activities. The opinion also warned that the “right to be forgotten” can adversely affect freedom of expression.

Posted in Consumer Privacy, International/EU Privacy

Making Sense of China’s New Privacy Laws and Draft Internet Privacy Regulations

Although China does not have an omnibus privacy statute or framework, the Chinese government recently has released a number of new privacy guidelines and regulations. This blog posts discusses a number of those guidelines and regulations, including two draft rules: Provisions on the Protection of the Personal Information of Telecommunications, and Internet Users and the Provisions on Registration of the True Identity Information of Phone Users (“Provisions on Phone Users”).