Header graphic for print
HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: data protection officers

Posted in International/EU Privacy, News & Events

Germany Publishes English Version of its National GDPR Implementation Act

The German Ministry of Interior affairs has published an English translation of the new Federal Data Protection Act (Bundesdatenschutzgesetz – BDSG). On 27 April 2017 the German Parliament passed the BDSG in order to make use of the opening clause provided for in the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This bill has been controversial; see here for an interview with Jan Albrecht, Stefan Brink and Tim Wybitul.

The new BDSG replaces its national predecessor, which has been in force for the last 40 years. The new BDSG is the first step toward adapting national German member State law to the provisions of the GDPR. With an effective date of 25 May 2018, the new BDSG will also form the basis for the adaption of further German data privacy acts to the GDPR. We note that several ministries have already indicated that they are preparing specific data privacy provisions concerning special processing situations like social security data protection, and we expect these provisions to follow the implementation of the BDSG.

This overview summarizes the major implications of the BDSG for companies operating in Germany.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Triple GDPR Guidance Issued by Article 29 Working Party

No one could accuse the EU Article 29 Working Party of not delivering as promised. Following its recently held December plenary meeting, the WP29 has released three separate guidelines with their interpretation of some key aspects of the General Data Protection Regulation, namely: data portability, data protection officers, and lead supervisory authorities. At the same time, the WP29 has confirmed its role as the “EU centralised body” for handling individual complaints under the Privacy Shield and the re-establishment of its enforcement subgroup in charge of coordinating cross-border enforcement actions. We explore the three guidelines in this post.