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HL Chronicle of Data Protection Privacy & Information Security News & Trends

Tag Archives: CJEU

Posted in International/EU Privacy

The CJEU Gives the UK Government Another Brexit Dilemma

In yet another key case dealing with the balance between citizens’ privacy and the ability of the state to intrude into it, the Court of Justice of the European Union has ruled on the compatibility with European Union law of legislation that authorises the retention of communications data, which includes personal data. The reference from the UK Court of Appeal resulted from a challenge to the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 brought by individuals that include Tom Watson, deputy leader of the Labour Party and represented by Liberty. Interveners include the Law Society of England and Wales, the Open Rights Group, and Privacy International. The CJEU considered the compatibility of such legislation with the e-Privacy Directive, Articles 7 and 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union—which protect private and family life and personal data respectively—and its previous decision in C-293/12 Digital Rights Ireland—which invalidated the Data Retention Directive.

Posted in Consumer Privacy

Details of Legal Challenge to Privacy Shield Revealed

Ever since the first draft of the EU-US Privacy Shield framework was published in early 2016, groups opposed to the idea have indicated their intent to challenge the legality of the framework under EU law. Recently, the privacy advocacy group Digital Rights Ireland made good on that promise. Following the filing of a formal complaint on 15 September asking for an annulment of the framework by the Court of Justice of the European Union, DRI has now made public the details of its complaint.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

The Ever-Expanding Concept of Personal Data

The Court of Justice of the European Union has ruled that dynamic IP addresses are capable of constituting personal data under certain circumstances, ending years of speculation about whether such essential building blocks of the Internet qualified for protection under the EU Data Protection Directive. In Patrick Breyer v Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Breyer challenged the collection and use of dynamic IP addresses from websites run by the German Federal Government. The CJEU decided that in circumstances where a third party holds information which might likely be used to identify the user of a website when put together with the dynamic IP addresses held by the provider of that website, those IP addresses constitute personal data. In this blog post, we explore the decision in Breyer, which may impact the laws and concept of personal data of Member States beyond Germany.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Privacy Shield Receives Final Approval from European Commission—Some Initial Practical Advice

On 12 July 2016, the European Commission issued its much awaited “adequacy decision” concerning the Privacy Shield framework for the transfer of personal data from the EU to the U.S. This adequacy decision is based on the latest version of the Privacy Shield, which was further negotiated and revised following the Article 29 Working Party’s April 2016 concerns with the terms of the original Privacy Shield framework. Many of our clients have questions about Privacy Shield—what it is, when it will be available for use, and how it differs from other data transfer mechanisms, among others. We have prepared blog post to answer these questions about the updated version of Privacy Shield and its implications for companies engaging in trans-Atlantic data flows.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Untying the Global Dataflows Mess

One of Harry Houdini’s most difficult tricks consisted of escaping from a nail-fastened and rope-bound wooden crate with manacles on his hands and feet, while submerged in New York’s East River. That feat is starting to look straightforward when compared to the prospect of lawfully exporting personal data out of the European Union. The restrictions on transfers of data to jurisdictions that do not provide an adequate level of protection have been in place for more than 20 years. And while these restrictions have not prevented the development of the digital economy, judging by this issue’s current direction of travel, we could be facing a situation from which not even the great Houdini could escape.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Future-Proofing Privacy: Scope of the Application of the Law

Part 2 of Future-Proofing Privacy: Scope of the Application of the Law. It is absolutely crucial for organisations to know if they are or are not subject to the Regulation. Since the Regulation strengthens data protection principles, requires organisations to demonstrate compliance and ushers in greater enforcement powers for regulators, it is essential for all organisations, public and private, local, national or global, to understand in what circumstances the Regulation will apply to their use of personal data. Unlike EU ‘directives’, EU ‘regulations’ are by nature directly effective in EU Member States and so do not require further implementation into national laws. Previously, European data protection law was governed by the Data Protection Directive. It was the responsibility of Member States to implement the Data Protection Directive into their national law. When the Regulation becomes law, it will apply immediately throughout the EU due to its direct effect. As a consequence, national data protection acts will cease to be relevant for all matters falling within the scope of the Regulation.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

A Brief Analysis of the European Parliament and the Article 29 Working Party’s Criticisms of Privacy Shield

Unveiled February 29, 2016, the new EU-U.S. Privacy Shield attempts to address the shortcomings of the Safe Harbor arrangement identified originally by the European Commission and later by the Court of Justice of the European Union in its Schrems decision. The Privacy Shield proposes improved data protection principles, better enforcement by the US Department of Commerce and the Federal Trade Commission, redress mechanisms for EU citizens, and safeguards surrounding law enforcement and intelligence activities. The European Parliament adopted a resolution on May 26, 2016 praising the progress made, but highlighting shortcomings in the Privacy Shield as presented in February 2016. Now that the Irish Data Protection Controller has referred another data transfer mechanism known as Standard Contractual Clauses to the courts for review of their adequacy, greater focus will be placed on whether the criticisms of Privacy Shield are well founded.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Hogan Lovells Issues Legal Analysis of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield

In a thorough legal analysis of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework, a report from Hogan Lovells says the framework would stand up in the Court of Justice of the European Union, and the true level of data protection afforded by the Privacy Shield framework will only be demonstrated by its functioning and the practices of its participants.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

First Look: EU–U.S. Privacy Shield

On February 29, 2016 and after more than two years of negotiations with the U.S. Department of Commerce, the European Commission released its draft Decision on the adequacy of the new EU–U.S. Privacy Shield program, accompanied by new information on how the Program will work. The Privacy Shield documentation is significantly more detailed than that associated with its predecessor, the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor, as it describes more specifically the measures that organizations wishing to use the Privacy Shield must implement. Importantly, the Privacy Shield provides for additional transparency and processes associated with U.S. government access to the personal data of EU individuals.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Safe Harbor Aftermath – Never a Reason to Panic

It’s close to 7pm on a Friday evening and my team are trying their best to manage our clients’ stress and frantic desperation. Jokes about how much they love Max Schrems are shared by email. In the meantime, we are diligently working our way through endless charts of dataflows and attempting to cover every single […]

Posted in International/EU Privacy

A New Turn in the Safe Harbor Roller Coaster

The roller coaster of developments affecting the Safe Harbor framework shows no signs of slowing down. It has taken a couple of years since Edward Snowden’s revelations for the train to reach to its highest point, but once the European Court of Justice ruled on the Schrems case, we knew it would be a bumpy ride. In the past weeks, most of the attention has focused on the EU data protection authorities, which are now more emboldened than ever and keen to capitalize on the ECJ’s decision to tighten the regime affecting international dataflows. The European Commission’s communication of 6 November to the European Parliament and the Council of the EU, coupled with its practical guidance, represents yet another turn in this uncertain journey. At the same time, the Commission’s intervention is helpful in terms of the decision-making process that many organisations—for which transatlantic transfers are vital—are trying to grapple with.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

European Commission Issues Opinion on Safe Harbor after Schrems

On November 6, 2015, the European Commission issued its widely anticipated Communication to the European Parliament and Council about the effect of the Court of Justice of the European Union’s Schrems decision, which invalidated the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor framework. The Commission expresses a commitment to negotiate with the U.S. Government a new framework for cross-border transfers of personal data. The Commission also emphasizes that the Communication does not have binding legal effect, but concludes that companies should rely on “alternative tools” for authorizing data flows to third countries like the United States.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Why the U.S. Is Held to a Higher Data Protection Standard Than France

In a recent column for The New York Times, Nils Muiznieks, the top human rights official for the Council of Europe, warned that recent surveillance laws in Europe undermine fundamental rights for European citizens. Plus, an October 29, 2015, resolution of the European Parliament complains of an “obvious downward spiral” resulting from mass surveillance laws in the U.S. and Europe. That certain European countries have laws permitting mass surveillance is not news to lawyers who follow the matter. In a 2012 whitepaper, we highlighted the broad and sometimes unsupervised powers of intelligence agencies of certain European governments. As Muiznieks’s column states, intelligence agencies are getting more surveillance power, not less. France’s July 2015 surveillance law permits intelligence agencies to scan metadata of all citizens in order to detect suspicious patterns. Other European countries are also broadening surveillance powers to protect against terrorism.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Spanish Data Protection Authority Clarifies Requirements for Cross-Border Transfers to Safe Harbor US entities

On Tuesday November 3, the Spanish data protection authority, Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, sent a letter all companies operating in Spain that had previously notified the AEPD of cross-border data transfers to Safe Harbor certified companies. The letter warns companies that because Safe Harbor certifications are no longer recognized as valid, they must take steps to ensure that alternative mechanisms are implemented in order to continue transferring data to Safe Harbor certified companies in the United States. In particular, the AEPD is requiring of all companies that received the letter to inform it not later than January 29, 2016 of any mechanisms that have been implemented to ensure adequate protections for personal data transferred to importers in the United States.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EU Data Protection: ECJ Extends the Long Arm of the Law

National EU member state courts, as well as the European Court of Justice, have struggled for several years to define the scope of application of EU data protection law in individual member states. In a decision that provides important guidelines on the competence of, and co-operation between, national data protection authorities, the ECJ has clarified how data protection law applies in cross-border situations within the EU.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

EU Data Transfers: Considering Your Options After Today’s Article 29 Working Party Statement

The EU’s Article 29 Working Party issued a statement today on the recent Schrems decision invalidating the adequacy of the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor framework, emphasizing that affected businesses should start to put in place legal and technical solutions in a timely manner to meet EU data protection standards. The statement gave a January 2016 deadline for companies to come into compliance with the ruling, at which point EU data protection authorities would be “committed to take all necessary and appropriate actions, which may include coordinated enforcement actions.” In response, we publish here a high-level analysis of the possible options available for companies—including the EU Standard Contractual Clauses, Intra-Group Agreements and other ad-hoc contracts, Binding Corporate Rules, Safe Harbor 2.0, and consent—and the pros and cons of choosing each one.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Recording and Deck from Webinar: Safe Harbor Invalidated – What Next?

Thank you to everyone who participated in today’s webinar “Safe Harbor Invalidated – What Next?”, in which we analyzed the implications of yesterday’s decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union invalidating the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor Framework. A copy of the slide deck and a link to a recording of the webinar are attached to this post.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Safe Harbor Invalidated – What Next?

On 6 October 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union declared the EU-US Safe Harbor framework invalid as a mechanism to legitimize transfers of personal data from the EU to the US. This decision effectively leaves any organisation that relied on Safe Harbor exposed to claims that such data transfers are unlawful. In this post, we outline the effects of the decision and a suggested plan of action, and include details for a webinar we will be hosting on Wednesday, 7 October to discuss the next steps that organisations should take.

Posted in International/EU Privacy, News & Events

Upcoming Webinar: Safe Harbor—What Next?

Next Tuesday, the Court of Justice of the European Union is scheduled to publish its decision in Maximillian Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner, in which it is expected to rule on the validity of the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Framework. Last week’s opinion of the CJEU’s Advocate General emphatically found Safe Harbor to be inadequate under EU law on the basis that access to Safe Harbor data by U.S. intelligence services is too wide and disproportionate, and that Safe Harbor does not contain appropriate guarantees to prevent this level of access. While the AG’s opinion is not binding on the CJEU, the short turn-around implies that the CJEU will not vary significantly from the opinion.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

European Court Advocate General’s Opinion Threatens Safe Harbor

The Opinion of the Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union on the case assessing the status and validity of Safe Harbor has created significant uncertainty relating to its immediate future. While the CJEU has not yet ruled, the AG’s decisions are typically quite influential. The AG’s view is that the Safe Harbor program does not provide an adequate level of data protection and that it should have already been invalidated by the European Commission.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Part 2: Scope of the Application of the Law

When the General Data Protection Regulation becomes law, it will apply immediately throughout the EU due to its direct effect. It is absolutely crucial for organisations to know if they are or are not subject to the Regulation. Since the Regulation strengthens data protection principles, requires organisations to demonstrate compliance and ushers in greater enforcement powers for regulators, it is essential for all organisations, public and private, local, national or global, to understand in what circumstances the Regulation will apply to their use of personal data. This entry is an excerpt from Hogan Lovells’ “Future-proofing privacy: A guide to preparing for the EU Data Protection Regulation.”

Posted in International/EU Privacy

A Credible Strategy for One Stop Shop

It’s been said before but the CJEU’s decision on the Google Spain v. AEPD case was a real game changer. Every law student on the planet learns that there are a number of sources that contribute to the legal system of a given jurisdiction. First and foremost are the statutes adopted by – in the best of cases – democratically elected parliaments. Then there are a myriad of legal obligations that arise from various sources ranging from regulatory guidance to market practices. Ultimately, the most authoritative source is the case law that is constantly emerging from courts’ decisions. Data protection law is no exception and the CJEU has emerged as the ultimate interpreter of the legislator’s will.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Hogan Lovells Partner Considers Potential CJEU Ruling on Safe Harbor

The fact that the Safe Harbor framework is permanently in the firing line is not particularly earth-shattering, but the prospect of the top European court declaring its inadequacy later this year could have dramatic consequences. This prospect became all the more possible after a hearing at the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in Luxembourg in March. In an article published in the May 2015 issue of Privacy Laws & Business International Report, Eduardo Ustaran, Partner in Hogan Lovells’ Global Privacy and Information Management Practice, explores the policy climate that led to the CJEU’s potential reckoning of the Safe Harbor and the potential consequences of the eventual ruling.