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Category Archives: International/EU Privacy

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Posted in International/EU Privacy

An Opportunity to Shape Compliance with GDPR

A close observer of the GDPR will have noticed that, in several places, individual EU Member States can implement derogations from the GDPR requirements. Of course, as a regulation under EU law there is less scope for local flexibility under the GDPR than under the current EU Data Protection Directive 95/46. Yet the GDPR does, in a number of key areas, allow an EU Member State to set down local laws that could allow a more locally relevant flavour to a particular aspect of compliance. The closing date for submitting views is Wednesday, 10 May 2017.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

When Did You Last See Your Filing Cabinets? UK ICO Fine for Discarded Data Shows Accountability in Action

If you care enough about privacy issues to be a regular reader of this blog, you probably know that one of the Big Changes under GDPR will be the introduction of “accountability” as a legal obligation, i.e. it will now be a requirement that a data controller is able to demonstrate its compliance with the principles relating to processing of personal data set out in Article 5 of the GDPR. You may even have started thinking about what this means for your organisation: how are you going to get your development teams to adopt privacy by design and default? What are you doing about data minimisation? Do you apply appropriate levels of encryption to your personal data? In our ever-more digitally driven world, it’s easy to get caught up in the sophisticated stuff, but a recent UK ICO decision reminds us that accountability is about the simple stuff as well. Which brings us to filing cabinets.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

UK ICO Publishes Guidance on Consent Under GDPR

The UK Information Commissioner’s Office has just published draft guidance on consent under GDPR. This is an interesting move given that the Article 29 Working Party has promised guidance on the same topic later this year, but reading the guidance makes it clear why the ICO decided to prioritise it: many of the practices which it identifies as unacceptable are fairly common in the UK, meaning many companies are going to have to re-think their approach to legitimising their data processing.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Australia Introduces Mandatory Data Breach Notification Scheme

On 13 February 2017, the Australian Senate passed into law the Privacy Amendment Bill 2016. This law amends the primary privacy and data protection legislation in Australia, Privacy Act 1988, to introduce the long-anticipated mandatory data breach notification scheme. Under this scheme, all agencies and businesses that are regulated by the Privacy Act are required to provide notice to the Australian Information Commissioner and affected individuals of certain data breaches that are likely to result in “serious harm.”

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Polish DPA Releases Data Privacy Inspection Plans – Targets Health, Shopping

The Polish Data Protection Authority has just released its inspection plans for 2017. This year, the GIODO has decided to target its review of compliance with data protection laws on the health services sector, as well as on the consumer sector, with particular attention to certain profiling activities taking place in stores and shopping malls.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

ICO Turns Spotlight on Data Broker Industry

Data brokers are organisations that obtain data from a variety of sources and then sell or license it to third parties. Many trade in personal data, which is purchased by their customers for several purposes, most commonly to support marketing campaigns. The UK data protection regulator has for some time been actively enforcing against organisations who buy individuals’ personal data for direct marketing purposes without first conducting appropriate due diligence to ensure that those individuals have adequately consented to receiving marketing communications. However, in a recently issued monetary penalty notice, the ICO indicated that it may be shifting its enforcement strategy. This post discusses the latest developments.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

“Cybersecurity Review” Takes Shape in China

On 4 February 2017, the Cyberspace Administration of China issued a draft of the Network Products and Services Security Review Measures for public comment: the Draft Measures remain open for comments until 4 March 2017. The Draft Measures are follow-on legislation to China’s Cyber Security Law adopted on 7 November 2016, which will take effect from 1 June 2017.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Russia Increases Fines for Violations of Data Protection Laws

On 7 February 2017, the Russian President signed into law a bill introducing amendments to the Russian Code on Administrative Offences that increases the amount of the fines imposed for violating Russian data protection laws and differentiates the relevant offences’ types. The greatest increase raises maximum fines for certain violations from RUB 10,000 to 75,000 (approx. USD 170 to 1,260).The law will come into force on 1 July 2017.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Interview with Jan Albrecht, Dr. Stefan Brink and Tim Wybitul on the New German Data Protection Bill

On 1 February 2017, the German federal cabinet adopted a draft data protection bill. The planned implementation statute aims to supplement and further define the EU General Data Protection Regulation, which will come into force in 2018. The Chronicle of Data Protection’s summary of the most relevant aspects of the draft bill can be found here. We turn now to a preliminary assessment and explanation of proposed bill, provided by German Data Protection and Freedom of Information Officer Dr. Stefan Brink, European Parliament member Jan Albrecht, and Hogan Lovells partner Tim Wybitul.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Changes in Japan Privacy Law to Take Effect in Mid-2017; Key Regulator Provides Compliance Insights

Recent changes to Japan’s Act on the Protection of Personal Information and the establishment of a new Personal Information Protection Commission have raised questions about how the world’s third-largest economy plans to implement new domestic requirements and engage internationally on cross-border data transfers, APEC, new technologies, and more. Hogan Lovells recently hosted some of Japan’s senior data privacy regulators and advisors for a special briefing in our Washington, D.C. offices.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

German Government Presents Revised Draft GDPR Implementation Bill

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which comes into force in May 2018, is generally designed to align data protection requirements across the EU. However, its opening clauses offer countries some freedom in their implementation of the Regulation and, thus, room to differ. In August 2016, the German Ministry of the Interior released its first GDPR implementation proposal to widespread criticism from both experts and data protection authorities. Recently, the BMI published a revised proposal, a new Federal Data Protection Act. The draft provides further details regarding the scope and implementation of existing GDPR provisions and also contains additional data protection requirements beyond those provided for in the Regulation. We explore notable specifications to and deviations from the GDPR.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Trump’s Executive Order Does Not Impact U.S. Privacy Shield Commitments

Last Wednesday, President Trump signed an immigration-related Executive Order titled “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States” that, among other things, removed the ability of federal agencies to extend protections under the Privacy Act to anyone other than U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents. Some initial observers have suggested that this means that the U.S. government is pulling back from its commitments to provide privacy protections to EU citizens, thus putting in peril the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework. Upon closer examination, however, the Executive Order does not impact any of the U.S. commitments under the Privacy Shield, nor does it revoke protections for EU citizens under the Privacy Act provided pursuant to the Judicial Redress Act.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

DSM Watch: European Commission’s Data Package Explores Data Ownership, Localization, Liability and Portability, Highlighting Tensions with GDPR

On January 10, 2017, the European Commission released a Communication, a fact sheet, a working document and a public consultation relating to Europe’s “data economy”. The fact sheet states that “data is a new type of economic asset”, which is essential for innovation and growth. The Commission’s objective is to remove “unjustified restrictions” and “legal uncertainties” in order to facilitate data sharing and innovation.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Privacy in 2017 – From Challenges to Opportunities

After all of the 2016 drama, the start of a brand new year is a welcome development in itself – a clean sheet for a script yet to be written. However, 2017 will not be without challenges and the same applies to the world of privacy and data protection. Many of the big issues that arose during 2016 will need to be addressed in 2017. In addition, new questions will no doubt emerge. Here is an overview of the privacy challenges that lie ahead and what can be done about them.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

Russia Releases 2017 Data Privacy Inspection Plans; Microsoft Passes 2016 Inspection

At the end of 2016, territorial divisions of the Russian Data Protection Authority, Roskomnadzor, published their 2017 plans for conducting inspections of local companies’ compliance with Russian data privacy requirements, including data localization. The inspection plans contain a number of prominent multi-national and Russian companies.

Posted in International/EU Privacy, News & Events

University Panthéon-Assas (Paris II) and Hogan Lovells Launch a Data Protection Officer Degree

On January 5, 2017 Paris Law School Panthéon-Assas launched its first university degree aimed at training future Data Protection Officers under the new European General Data Protection Regulation, which becomes effective across the EU on May 25th, 2018. Created by Paris University Professor Bénédicte Fauvarque-Cosson and Hogan Lovells partner Winston Maxwell, the new program will include courses in law, cybersecurity, data analytics, management and ethics. The faculty will include professors from various law schools, as well as practicing DPOs, information security specialists, lawyers and regulators from the CNIL, and major companies including Sanofi, GE, Axa, Lagardère, Google, Microsoft, Schneider Electric, BNP Paribas and the Banque Postale.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

New Notice and Consent Rules under Proposed EU e-Privacy Regulation

The European Commission has released its proposal for a new EU e-Privacy Regulation that will replace the existing e-Privacy Directive. The high level aim of the draft e-Privacy Regulation is to harmonise the specific privacy framework relating to electronic communications within the EU and ensure consistency with the GDPR. Compared to the existing Directive, the draft e-Privacy Regulation has broader territorial reach and applies generally to the provision of electronic communications services to end users in the EU and to the use of such services. It is also concerned with the protection information related to the devices of end users located in the EU.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

UK Department for Transport Launches Consultation on Regulations for Civil Drone Usage

The 2016 holiday gift guides have heavily featured consumer drones; as such, it is not unfeasible that you or someone you know will receive a drone in the coming weeks. In anticipation of that happy event, on 21 December the UK Department for Transport gave its own gift: a consultation paper on ensuring the safe use of drones, to help the UK to tap into this growing market.

Posted in International/EU Privacy

The CJEU Gives the UK Government Another Brexit Dilemma

In yet another key case dealing with the balance between citizens’ privacy and the ability of the state to intrude into it, the Court of Justice of the European Union has ruled on the compatibility with European Union law of legislation that authorises the retention of communications data, which includes personal data. The reference from the UK Court of Appeal resulted from a challenge to the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 brought by individuals that include Tom Watson, deputy leader of the Labour Party and represented by Liberty. Interveners include the Law Society of England and Wales, the Open Rights Group, and Privacy International. The CJEU considered the compatibility of such legislation with the e-Privacy Directive, Articles 7 and 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union—which protect private and family life and personal data respectively—and its previous decision in C-293/12 Digital Rights Ireland—which invalidated the Data Retention Directive.